7-day Pill Box and RV Kitchens – what’s the connection?

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Whether you are a pack-rat or a minimalist, Arbutus RVers, there are a few items are usually absolutely necessary in your RV Kitchen. I decided to go online and compile a list of things that people have mentioned not being able to do without in their RV kitchens.

You might be setting up your RV kitchen for the first time and use this as a handy checklist (download a copy here) or, you might be looking to lighten your load (like me), and use this to compare and re-evaluate whether or not you REALLY need that garlic press/egg slicer/juicer/5-spice set for Indian Cooking/sushi rolling kit/third chopping board etc. Personally – I DO need that spice set and garlic press and multiple chopping boards…hmmmm egg slicer and juicer, maybe not so much.

To each their own. That’s the joy of RV’ing. Enjoy making your RV kitchen work for YOU!

Spices

Keep in mind that spices last a maximum of one year so stock only what you think you’ll use. Store in a cool, dark, dry location and give them the sniff test prior to using to assure flavor and freshness.

Use a 7-day pill box to take a nice assortment of basics with you in a compact and lightweight container. Here are a few suggestions –

  • salt/pepper
  • rosemary
  • thyme
  • oregano
  • chili powder
  • dill
  • paprika
  • cinnamon

OR – you could always do as my minimalist friend does and just carry a Costco-sized shaker of Montreal Steak Spice with you and be done with it!

Canned Goods

The weight of canned goods, as well as the space they take up, can add up quickly. I try to keep only the bare minimum basics on-hand, knowing that I can nip into a local store at any time to pick up what I might be missing.

I do like to keep at least one can or jar of each of the following in my pantry:

  • diced tomatoes
  • crushed tomotoes
  • baked beans (I love these on toast or with eggs)
  • kidney beans
  • salmon
  • clams
  • artichoke hearts
  • olives

Liquids

  • olive oil
  • vinegars (red wine, rice, apple cider, champagne, etc.)
  • Honey
  • Mustard

Dry Goods

Again, smaller and fewer is better, IMO. If I do keep these on hand, I make sure they’re in the smallest possible useable quantities. I find buying at the Bulk Food store and then transferring purchases to stacking plastic containers keeps things tidy and, again, compact.

  • Pasta
  • Couscous
  • Salad dressing mix (dry
  • )Nuts (of all varieties)
  • Crackers
  • Chips
  • Snack bars (my personal fave – Lara Bars – amazing!)
  • Flour
  • Sugar
  • Tea bags (several varieties)
  • Coarse ground coffee for my French press

Kitchen Equipment Basics

  • Plastic cutting board
  • Paring knife10-inch chef’s knife
  • Serrated (bread) knife
  • Vegetable peeler
  • Can opener and bottle opener
  • Tongs and pancake turner/spatula
  • Serving spoons
  • Soup ladle
  • Colander and/or mesh strainer
  • 1 medium and 1 large non-stick skillet
  • 2 saucepans
  • Dutch oven for cooking pasta and stews
  • Mixing bowls (can also double as serving bowls)
  • Square or rectangular baking pan
  • Resealable plastic bags
  • Aluminum foil and plastic wrap
  • Long butane lighter
  • Non-abrasive dishwashing sponge
  • Biodegradable dishwashing detergent
  • Paper towels
  • Pot holders and dishtowels
  • Trivets for hot pans (extra potholders will work)
  • Sliverware
  • Coffeemaker (auto or French press)/thermos

And there you have it! A pared down but, I believe, effective starter list for the smaller RV.

In closing a few of the tools that many, many RV’ers seem to find indispensible in their Kitchens.

  • Blender or Magic Bullet
  • Slow cooker
  • Electric frypan

You can check out what newbie RV’er Gerry B decided he couldn’t live without in his new RV kitchen here!

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